Service Design and Venture-as-a-Service

Service Design (SERVD) is the application of range of established and new design tools that are used to identify, define and optimise systems, touchpoints, people’s roles and the ecologies that deliver innovative services.

The Services Sector

In the UK, there has been a massive shift in economic power from manufacturing to services in the past five decades. In 1948, British industry (including manufacturing, oil & gas extraction, and utilities) accounted for 41% of the British economy but by 2013, it was just 14%. At the same time the service sector’s share of the economy has risen from 46% to 79%. (Source: The Guardian ).

Compare the UK’s GDP from services to Europe’s where it is 72%, China has 45%, the USA 71% and worldwide it is 65%. (Source: The Economist)

 Service Design in a Venture-as-a-Model

Increasingly Service Design is being offered by business and transformation consultancies. In the past year 18 months, a number of the world’s leading consultancies have bought creative agencies and now offer Service and UX design as part of a transformation offering. For example, Accenture bought Fjord, Ernst & Young bought Seren, Kinsey bought Lunar and Boston Consulting Group bought S&C to establish BCG Digtial Ventures.

Service Thinking (Ben Reason et al) places people, networks and experiences at the core of how service designers innovate with business stakeholders and technology groups to create new and engaging services. Design Thinking works well when it is used in conjunction with Blue Ocean Strategies in the creation of new ventures. It is noteworthy that Service Design (along with experience design and strategic design) are core offerings in the major transformation groups as they shift from a service-as-a-fee model to venture-as-a-service.

 Service Design is a process of design that is customer-centric and systems orientated that is distinct from user experience design and interaction design but part of a triptych for designing in the experience economy.

Service_design4.fw

As Service Design is a relatively new discipline in design, it is misunderstood and underused by many of companies while services are often poorly planned, badly designed and inefficiently implemented. There is a huge gap between the customer’s and user’s experience of engaging with a service and the organisations.

80% of companies think they offer a superior service, yet only 8% of their customers agree. (Design Council)

Although service design is growing rapidly and is increasingly recognised as an enabler of system and transformational change it lacks visibility.

I was an early adopter of service design, having recognised in the 1990s that an advanced product’s functionality and support systems were both embedded and increasingly distributed and connected through the Internet.

Organisations needed innovation that meant taking a more holistic approach that was concerned with touchpoints (products and apps), environments (retail or civic), systems (networks, eCommerce, etc.) and the organisation (people and culture).

Service Thinking emerged from Design Thinking (Kelly et al) as a way to identify and solve problems systemically in organisations. Livework’s founders Ben Reason, Chris Downs and Lars Löveren worked with IDEO before launching the first Service Design agency in London 2001.

Where to use Service Design

According to the Design Council (UK), Service Design adds significant value when applied in the one or more of the following circumstances:

1. Service design as a methodology with tools to deliver optimised offerings and experiences.

2. Service design as a people-centred process to address specific operational and organisational needs.

3. Service design as a collaborative process that requires a co-design and people focused approach.

4. Service design as a methodology optimise complex systems and interconnected ecologies to create disruptive innovation.


Service Design Tools

As a service designer there are a range of tools that I can utilise, here are a few and for a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in peterfossic.co

ACTOR MAP

An actors map is a diagram representing the relationship of  people and stakeholder called ‘actors’ in a service ecology. It provides a systemic view of a service.  The diagram is built by identifying the actors, touchpoints and high level view of the service. The diagram is built from a specific actor and will feature other actors and touchpoints that are connected to and can influence or interact wth the actor via the service.

BLUEPRINT (SERVICE)

The service blueprint is a tool that describes the operational nature and the characteristics of the system, the actors, context, touchpoints and the interaction model that support and form the service. It is based on flows through the system and uses a standardised graphical technique that displays the process functions above and below the line of visibility from the customers viewpoint, where all the touchpoints and the back-stage processes are documented and aligned to the user experience.

EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPING

This tool involves creating objects or ‘props’ and acting out the interaction model (see above) to explore the way a proposed service concept will work. This approach is also referred to as ‘evidencing’ or ‘body storming’, where the use of models and objects representing touchpoints are to enable designers to take ideas and interact together to assess their usefulness. This process is highly iterative and use ‘rough & ready prototyping’ techniques.

For a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in factotum-design.co.uk

This post first appeared in Peterfossick.co

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Apple’s iBeacon & Proximity Location

News from Apple about iBeacon  – a new technology that extends Location Services in iOS. Your iOS device can alert apps when you approach or leave a location with an iBeacon. In addition to monitoring location, an app can estimate your proximity to an iBeacon (for example, a display or checkout counter in a retail store). Instead of using latitude and longitude to define the location, iBeacon uses a Bluetooth low energy signal, which iOS devices detect. To learn more about Bluetooth technology, see the official Bluetooth website. More news about iBeacon here
FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

LESS is Lean CSS

Here at Factotum we’ve been using LESS for a couple of years to create websites on the for fly for eziCONEX.com. LESS stands for Leaner CSS. It is a dynamic stylesheet language designed by Alexis Sellier that is influenced by Sass and has influenced the newer “SCSS” syntax of Sass, which adapted its CSS-like block formatting syntax. LESS is open-source and its first version was written in Ruby, however in the later versions, use of Ruby has been deprecated and replaced by JavaScript. The indented syntax of LESS is a nested meta-language as valid CSS is valid LESS code with the same semantics. LESS provides the following mechanisms: variables, nesting, mixins, operators and functions; the main difference between LESS and other CSS pre-compilers being that LESS allows real-time compilation via LESS.js by the browser. LESS can run on the client-side and server-side or can be compiled into plain CSS. I think we’ll be seeing more of LESS in the future.
FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Hot Trend – Ghost Buttons

A noteworthy and perhaps one of the biggest trends of 2014 has been the Ghost Buttons (they are the transparent and clickable elements in a UI that are this big simple buttons). You’ll see these buttons on splash pages featuring those big epic images… and if you hadn’t noticed they are taking the UI design world by storm.

So the basic elements of a ghost button are: they are basic, flat shaped and often geometric – a square, rectangle, or circle.  Importantly they have no fill and feature just a a simple stroked outline. They are  transparent, (or perhaps have a faint opacity)  asides from the outline and text – and that’s where the term  ghost is derived from.

They are popping up all over the web and seem to be popular in creative and cultural sectors like fashion, photography and interior design.

These buttons suit a minimal theme and layout, often featuring large format images. They tend to be somewhat larger than traditional clickable buttons on websites and are often situated in the center of the screen.  
FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

No More Passwords!

Clef is a Start-Up in the Bay Area that has developed a very secure access, payment and encryption technology. Clef’s mobile app replaces usernames and passwords using your smartphone. When you use Clef, you create a digital key that never leaves your phone. The technology is based on secure passwordless 2-factor authentication that can be set-up in less than 10 minutes. CLEF is easy to implement using WordPress, hosted sites and with third parties. Its new payment system makes paying online, using your mobile phone, easy and secure. Factotum, working with MUCHO, in San Francisco, organised an innovation bootcamp for CLEF that lead to huge impacts on their business. We closed worked closely with the CLEF team and invited luminaries and Angel Investors to create an innovation road-map that could be used to allocate design and development resources as CLEF brought its products to market, created its services and built developed its brand. Get CLEF’s App andvVisit their site here https://getclef.com
FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.