Category Archives: Disruption

TEDx Reset – Why Robots Need To Dream

Peter Fossick, of Factotum was recently invited to talk at TEDx Reset about ‘Why Robots Need to Dream’.

We’ve posted a link to the video here, in which Peter talks about the selling of technology of Utopian futures that often have social, economic and cultural impacts that favour the few while penalising not only the majority of people but the environment as well. Peter argues that this is the result of new technology but rather the principles, ethics and practices of modern neo-liberal capitalism.

If you enjoy the video you can catch Peter at UX Istanbul in February where as a guest speaker he’ll be talking about DesignOps.

DevOps meet DesignOps

Factotum’s Pete Fossick recently spoke at the Service Design Global Conference in Madrid where he discussed service design, agility and the emergent field of design operations (DesignOps or DesOps) and how they are part Design 4.0 – an emerging approach to designing for Industry 4.0.

A brief history of design… Design 1.0 was paper and pen, using physical tools like a ruler featuring a human agent. Design 2.0 was computer assisted design (CAD) featuring applications driven by a human agent. Design 3.0 was assisted design using CAD apps where knowledge based systems learn from the human actor. Design 4.0 is fully autonomous or semi autonomous design that may or may not involve a human actor (a designer, developer or product owner).

Design 4.0 is an approach to design that marries design for transformation and advanced technologies to deliver innovative and breakthrough products and services for the outcome economy. My talk seemed to resonate with a large number of attendees and there is a sense that there is a shift underway in the practices and approaches we need to use in an agile world informed by huge quantities of data that involves people-to-people, people-to-machine and machine-to-machine interactions.

Design 4.0 marries BizOps, DevOps and the emerging field of Design Operations (or Design Ops) to support design that features semi-autonomous and fully autonomous computer systems (machine learning). While Design 4.0 as a term has been used in different ways to describe design that is focused on social innovation (GK Van Patter, 2009), my definition extends the application of design as a transformation practice to include business thinking and Dev Ops thinking where machine learning and assistive technologies support and inform the design and transformation process.

The conclusion of a new Government-commissioned report by a group representing some of the UK’s top companies, led by Siemens UK and Professor Juergen Maier indicates that robotics, autonomous systems, artificial intelligence and cutting-edge technologies in IoT can deliver huge benefits where Government and industry co-operate and may be able to create 175,000 new manufacturing jobs and generate an extra £455bn in GDP in the UK.

Service, experience, interaction and visual design as a set of practices offer strategic and tactical approaches to designing products and services that are proving highly effective in a world that is undergoing a digital transformation. Coupled with Design Thinking and Human Centred Design they have utilised contextual research and participatory work with users, employees and customers as part of a collaborative design process to gather both qualitative and quantitative data undertaken in an iterative and phased process. However, design thinking (Rolf Faste et al) as an approach has its origins in the 1980s as set practices that are essentially analogue in nature and are both people and time intensive.

However, increasingly design is informed with data-derived insights using advancing data collection techniques and processed using increasingly ubiquitous machine learning and cognitive computing applications. A traditional phased design model or lean approach is not always fast enough or efficient in an agile world where bespoke services and user experiences can be configured in an instant to match a users preferences, behaviours and location and their unique circumstances.

For companies to compete in the Outcome Economy as a part of industry 4.0 requires a new model; Design 4.0, that will increasingly feature machine intelligence and a data informed driven strategy that features data garnered using people-to-people, people-to-machine and machine-to-machine interactions. More on this in the coming weeks and months!

Apple’s iBeacon & Proximity Location

News from Apple about iBeacon  – a new technology that extends Location Services in iOS. Your iOS device can alert apps when you approach or leave a location with an iBeacon. In addition to monitoring location, an app can estimate your proximity to an iBeacon (for example, a display or checkout counter in a retail store). Instead of using latitude and longitude to define the location, iBeacon uses a Bluetooth low energy signal, which iOS devices detect. To learn more about Bluetooth technology, see the official Bluetooth website. More news about iBeacon here

The Medical Breakthrough Nobody’s Talking About

We came across this piece by Toby Cosgove about the transformational impact of designing Healthcare services and we wanted to share it.

Service Design has been delivering transformation in healthcare using design processes that have been pioneered in the UK. Here at Factotum we’ve been evangelising Service Design since 2006. We use holistic approaches to transform service ecologies and their touchpoints by finding where the pain points are located in complex service systems. We use proven methods and techniques to research, design, prototype and test services (Yes you can prototype services!) and we endeavour to deliver great experiences for stakeholders. To find out more about Service Design we recommend the Design Council’s Guide to Service Design on their website or contact us for an informal chat.

“The latest medical breakthrough hasn’t gotten much press, but it’s changing medicine even as we speak. It’s the dawning realization that healthcare is not about how many patients you can see, how many tests and procedures you can order, or how much you can charge for these things. The breakthrough is the understanding that healthcare is a value proposition, which means getting patients the right care, at the right time, in the right place. It’s a matter of focusing on outcomes and cost, so that more Americans will start getting what they pay for in healthcare dollars.” Read the article here on LinkedIn

 

Larry Keeley’s Ten Types of Innovation

Here at Factotum we are big fans of the Doblin Group and Larry Keeley. Larry et al have updated and revised their successful book – The Ten Types of innovation. It’s a must have for all designers, executives and and academics that are interested in innovation methodologies. Here’s how Larry and his team describe their methods:

“Successful innovators analyze the patterns of innovation in their industry. Then they make conscious, considered choices to innovate in different ways.

Ten Types of Innovation: The Discipline of Building Breakthroughs is the culmination of thirty years of analysis and research. The innovation framework was built around a seminal Doblin discovery, that there are ten distinct types of innovation that need to be orchestrated with care to make game-changing innovations.

We wrote this book to address how you can think about innovating effectively; how you can work to get the future to show up just slightly ahead of its regularly scheduled arrival; and how you can ensure your teams are equipped with the robust methods they need to succeed.” – Source: The Doblin Group

Get the book – Ten Types of Innovation